Sunday, 25 September 2016

Value-for-money: Kinokuniya or Booksdepository

Meet Kinokuniya and Books Depository. 

The former has physical brick-and-mortar and online stores while the latter is solely an online retailer. 

For all the book lovers out there, I am sure these are some of the places we go in order to satisfy our book cravings. Kinokuniya was where I picked up my first book on investing. I summarised some of my thoughts on that book here. Since then, I have bought at least 6 other books on investment and other genres that cost at least $200 in total from Kinokuniya. 

Book lovers should also know that Kinokuniya is not the cheapest for pricing. I came to know Books Depository recently, and boy is there a huge difference in price. 

Let's compare an investment book, say Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits and Other Writings. 

On Books Depository: $18.56, original price: $30.03 

On Kinokuniya: $37.40, member's price: $33.66 

If we are to compare prices only, then we have a clear winner here. Kinokuniya is still more expensive than Books Depository, even with their member's card. Books Depository seem to be always holding discounts when I visited the website. In addition, there is free delivery for Books Depository, though I am not sure how long the delivery takes since I have not tried it. 

But are we missing something here? 

I love the smell of books. I love how you can walk in and be greeted with just books. This is something, well, a physical experience you cannot replicate on an online store. I am sure some will walk into Kinokuniya, then order the book they want to buy from Books Depository. 

To be honest, I have also thought of it. But ever since I've learnt that Books Depository exists, I am still attracted to the physical mortar store. I still go to the mall, wanting to pass time and sometimes go home with a book on hand. The flagship Kinokuniya store at Ngee Ann City is full of people from all walks of life, with parents bringing their kids with hopes of kickstarting a reading habit from young.  

I suppose it's also how I guess when you get out of your house, you tend to meet a new friend, maybe of the opposite sex, who shares the same interest(well, I haven't, haha). 

The higher prices in Kinokuniya are obviously then, due to rent, and labour. I don't think physical bookstores will disappear completely in face of e-commerce. As much as I need to cut spending, I will support whenever I can if it's still within my budget. We can't move everything to e-commerce or e-books, can we? Sometimes, it's the physical experience that really matters.

To the book lovers out there, how do you purchase your books? 

Till next time, 

Saturday, 17 September 2016

My Insurance Policies

Too expensive. A waste of money. I don't need insurance. I don't know how much I'm covered. My parents bought insurance for me and handles it. 

These are just some of what people say. I've had some friends who said that when the topic is broached. Insurance isn't easy to understand at all! 

So many policies, so many insurers. To be honest, I'll still choose to let my parents handle it all. But I'm no longer a little boy. I took it upon myself to understand all my policies that my parents bought and which are the policies that I bought on my own. As to how it really started, other than me turning 21, it was also partly due to me wanting to know what I am actually buying. 

So it is time to look into the policies I have. Readers who know more about insurance, feel free to correct me on any point. Gladly appreciate it! 

Life Insurance

CPF Dependents Protection Scheme

Covers every CPF member from 21 years old and insures $46,000 in event of death or Total Permanent Disability up till 60 years old. 

Review: This is a no-brainer. I'm keeping this. Yearly premium is $36.00 now(note: premiums change with age) and paid through Ordinary Account in CPF.  

SAF Group Term Life/Group Personal Accident 

This is what every male who went through NS will probably have. I'm currently only insured $100,000 for Term Life and Personal Accident, paying $12.80 a month. After 1st October though, with the same $100k coverage, I only pay $5.17 a month. Half price.  

Review: Is $100k coverage for Death enough? No, if I die. My parents raised me up and I should at least make sure their retirement is comfortable if I am to pass away. If I do not die, but become permanently disabled or lose a limb due to an accident, then the Personal Accident(PA) will come in. So I'm planning to increase to $300k for Death/TPD and $500k for PA for now. There is group risk and hence, some limitations to policy cover. I will try to look for alternative insurers to diversify. 

AIA Whole Life/Prime Life/Financial Guardian x2 

My parents bought this 4 plans when I was 1-2 and 6 years old. The sum insured is only $42,000 in total and premiums are close to $500 a year. This comes with cash values and there are surrender values. Covers Death and TPD. 

Review: $500 a year isn't cheap for $42,000 coverage. It is a 100-year policy, though $42,000 will be grossly insufficient many decades down the road. I should see the returns in the cash value then. I don't mind such plans if I'm comfortable with the returns. Am trying to assess AIA eCare for latest data. 

Hospitalization Insurance 

I have a Great Eastern Supreme Health Plus B (Integrated Shield Plan) and premiums are $259 for age 21-30 now with no rider. 

KK Hospital Class B1 ward(4 beds)
Review: No-brainer, a must-have. According to the policy, I'm entitled to class B1 wards in government hospitals. I think I will be comfortable with B1 ward. As to whether I will want to add the rider(need to pay in cash), I think it is a good idea. As a young adult, the rider will help to pay the deductible and co-insurance and allow you to build your own Medisave and cash savings first. 

Disability Income 

I have not joined the workforce, so this Disability Income does not really apply yet to me, but I will be keeping it on my radar. 

Critical Illness/Early Critical Illness 

AVIVA seems to offer immense value in the Group Insurance Living Care and Living Care Plus Critical Illness(CI) policies. 

Review: The way I view it, CI plans are a must. Even if the ISP with rider should cover most medical expenses, the time required to get back to work can be a few months to a year long. In the meantime, Early CI(lower chances of dying) should compensate for the income loss. I'm aiming for $100k coverage for CI and early CI for now.  

AVIVA Living Care Plus Premiums
AVIVA Living Care Premiums

It will be difficult to talk about insurance because honestly, it is pretty boring. Who gets friends talking about it? But among some friends, I find that they are not understanding insurance enough. Some prefer to only know when they go out working or leave it all to their agents, without sufficiently understanding their own circumstances. For me, I will want to know what are the specifications of the product first, just like before buying a gadget. 

Still lots of hard work ahead. My gratitude to the financial bloggers who wrote a lot on insurance. It has been of much help. 

Till next time, 


Sunday, 21 August 2016

Thoughts on the Book: A Random Walk Down Wall Street

Random Walk
One in which future steps or directions cannot be predicted on the basis of past history

Around late last year, I sat down with my first ever book on investing/finance: A Random Walk Down Wall Street. I didn't know what to expect then. 

At its core, the book says you should just buy index funds and make it the core of your portfolio, manage it passively. Of course, then buy some individual stocks if you want the excitement. 

In other topics which stood out the most to me, The Fitness Manual presents exercises such as: You must start to save and start early, build reserves and insure yourself, be competitive with your reserves, make use of tax relief by putting money in retirement plans, understanding your investment objectives with a sleeping scale. 

The Life Cycle Guide presents how you can assess your risk based on age, and how the allocations like cash, bonds, stocks and real estate (REITS) can be rebalanced as you age. 

Behavioral finance is talked about, and the lessons from history also stood out to me. 

In valuation, there are basically 2 techniques: Firm foundation and castles in the air. The techniques of fundamental and technical analysis are debated in the book. 

Being a newbie, it was harder to understand the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH), Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT), pricing models and the debate on smart beta in the book. 

I felt that the writing was written with the layman in mind, with many analogies and statistical examples. The first part of the book teaches you to always remember the past lessons and relate how your own psychology is often your biggest enemy in investing. The middle of the book got a little more complicated with EMH and MPT. The last part of the book finishes it off with how you can conduct the walk with indexing. 

As it was the first serious investing book I read, it was generally easy to read and I found myself leaning slightly to some of what the book proposes. Of course, more than just being a teacher, the book also kicked off other habits. I started to read the Invest section of the TheSundayTimes. I started going to Kinokuniya to satisfy the craving for knowledge. I also bought and read The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham which was a far more difficult book to digest. 

Knowledge is power 
Francis Bacon

Till next time, 

Saturday, 30 July 2016

POSB Invest-Saver RSP Update

If I am to describe myself as an investor now, I will probably be an index investor. It has since been about 9 months ago that I subscribed to Invest-Saver. There were a couple of reasons that got me started. 

Firstly, I wanted to get started with stocks, secondly, learn about investing with a small capital and lastly, to discipline myself financially. 

9 months on, how did it fare? 

Dollar-Cost Averaging

$100 goes into the RSP monthly, except for June's amount of $200. 

Total Investment Costs and Cumulative Portfolio Value as of 30 July

Capital Gains/Losses as of 30 July

There were dividends of $2.93 in January and $10.59 in July. 

Total Return is $17.64 as of 29/7/16 which includes the dividends minus the commission costs. (Note that a few months back, the STI was really volatile and Total Return was negative, so it isn't all rosy always). Current share price stands at 2.93 as of 29/7/16). 

I am going to continue this plan until my ORD because that's when my cash flow stops. There was no particular reason for putting in $200 in June other than trying out the ATM function. 

There will always be different expectations of returns. A fellow army mate shared how he can win hundreds in a casino, another won hundreds in the recent World Cup. So when this topic came up, it's quite apparent that the returns are low and volatile for this Invest-Saver. But one of them signed up after he realized that time and the value of compounding could help here. To each his own. 

So I tell myself that in time, this RSP will shine even with corrections in the STI. I must be able to wait out those falls and be in for the long haul. 

Till next time, 

Monday, 18 July 2016

Don't let your smartphone be in control

No, I am not talking about the rise of artificial intelligence but rather on how we folks today are increasingly gluing our faces onto our smartphones. 

Singapore is ranked the highest globally in mobile penetration rate, read this here. Well, we do see almost everybody using a smartphone here, so much so that there are rising cases of zombies. In South Korea, authorities have tried to mitigate their smartphone zombies apocalypse. 
Photo from Asia News Network

Now, if you are reading this post while crossing the road, I suggest you put your phone into your pocket. If you are walking down the stairs from the train platform, please put away your phone.

The rise of the smartphone zombies

There were a few cases, whereby the person in front of me was watching a drama show, and she was so slow in walking down the stairs that everybody behind me was obviously annoyed. There were another instance, where I tapped on the shoulders of a guy in front of me, simply because he was walking too unpredictably while using his phone. I am not about to get stepped on in a stampede. 

I am sure we have been taught road safety from young to look left and right while crossing the zebra crossings and traffic lights. I make it a point till today but I observed some pedestrians just crossing the road while their faces were still glued and earbuds inside their ears. It's like as if the smartphone rips you of your senses and gives you a false sense of safety. 

Maybe we do need such signs like those used in South Korea too. 

Use your phone at the right time

Ever heard of the "If you see any suspicious article or person, please contact our staff or call 999" while taking the MRT? In light of recent terror attacks, I think it is being played more frequently but it seems many of us folks are glued to the screens until we probably won't know if the guy next to us left something behind or not. 

I am guilty of that. At times I can be very vigilant, doing my part to look around, at times I am scrolling through my Facebook feed or just turning on the screen for nothing. We take things for granted here. 

I am not dismissing smartphones for they have its benefits too. Accessing social media gives us the latest news on what is happening. We can plan an alternative route immediately even before reaching the station if we know of a disruption in the MRT system. 

But if we can use them at the right time such as not using it while crossing the road, or walking down the stairs or while traveling in the trains, I am sure that is a positive for our own safety and our loved ones too. 

The next time you whip out your phone, make sure if it's safe to do so for yourself and others. Remember, you are in control. 

Till next time, 


Tuesday, 21 June 2016

A Savings Account for National Servicemen (NSFs)

Update: I made some changes in the post below, reflecting some of the information that was not written previously and made existing information clearer. As of 2/7/16. 

Good news for us in NS! Other than putting the allowance into other savings accounts that offer meagre interest rates, we have this option now! An option to save for the 2 years or 22 months of service.

Introducing the POSB Save As You Earn (SAYE) account.

I was truly excited for this when I got wind of this. Looking deeper, I made some comparison. I thought the CIMB FastSaver might serve as a useful comparison as well. 


1. Saving

At the end of 2 years

  • Good for new enlistees who just wants to save a fixed amount every month and not do anything with it until they ORD. It gives fixed deposit rates for small amounts.
  • Note: This works like a 24-month fixed deposit,  so you will lose the 2% cash gift interest if you withdraw the sum. So do make sure you are comfortable with the amount being put in and go with it for the long haul.
2. Shopping
  • If you shop often, then you have those rebates so long as you have those cards. 
3. Cash Gift
  • More for new enlistees, you will have to decide if you would like the Home-TeamNS-POSB Debit Card or SAFRA DBS Debit. Those cards come with membership fees. Of course, if you are already intending to get either one, then this cash gift is a bonus.  
  • Existing SAFRA/HomeTeamNS card members do get the $30 cash gift too! 
CIMB FastSaver 

  • You don't have to "lock" the savings up and already get 1% from the get-go. 
  • There is a minimum initial deposit of $1000 to open the account. You also need to have a balance of $1000 in order to have interest paid, though. 
  • There are no ATM cards and no cash rebates for this account. You might also derail from your savings goal and feel the urge to spend since it is convenient to transfer between banks. 
Compared to POSB SAYE

CIMB FastSaver
Initial Amount: $1000 
Monthly Deposit: $100 
At the end of 2 years, 
Principal Amount: $3400  
Interest: $45.35 

Assuming the cash gift interest of 2% and not including the standard interest rates which can be accessed here
Initial Amount: $0 
Monthly Deposit: $100 
At the end of 2 years, 
Principal Amount: $2400  
Cash gift Interest: $51.80

POSB SAYE offers around $5 more. 

My personal thoughts

For the fresh enlistees, this will make perfect sense. If I am a fresh enlistee, I will sign up for POSB SAYE definitely. I can lock it up and forget about it until 2 years later. Probably transfer extra savings to POSB so that I can increase the monthly contribution. Don't transfer emergency funds to SAYE too, if you find yourself needing the cash, you are going to waste the effort. 

For existing enlistees, probably not worth it since time is not on our side. I have around 15 months of service left. Let's say I am to open a FastSaver SAYE account now, assuming $100 monthly contribution, at the end of 15 months, the interest will be $2.50 more. I would prefer to just keep it in FastSaver throughout and save the trouble since the 2% cash gift will not be applicable after ORD. 

With that said, I think the decision will lie on whether you want the HomeTeamNS or SAFRA cards if you don't have either one yet. The $30 cash gift, in a way, can then subsidise the costs. 

Fellow and future servicemen, please do your OWN homework for this! It's your hard-earned allowance! 

Till next time, 
Mr K. 

Sunday, 19 June 2016

Check your Eligibility for GST Voucher 2016!

Come 20 June 2016, Singaporeans can check if they are eligible for the GST Voucher 2016 handout! 
You can check it here: GSTVoucher2016

On top of the regular GST voucher, there is a one-off Cash Special Payment this year. 

I was surprised that I was eligible for it last year even before crossing my 21st birthday. 

I'm all hands up for handouts! I hope I am eligible again! Of course, it must be done with consideration for the country's wealth. I'm confident that the government has considered that. The additional one-off voucher (which will costs $280 million) will help Singaporeans a little more this year. 

Some personal thoughts

I was searching for more info and I came across the article. He quipped that" if we spend some of these in our neighbourhood shops, it will support our local businesses as well! Gratitude for Mr Heng. I read that he was a good MP and his residents liked him. Hope he makes a full recovery and continue to contribute to Singapore. 

It's important not to cultivate a mindset where people expects handouts from the government to the point of not working even when they are physically able to do so. I think the government will continue to keep the trampoline in good condition to allow Singaporeans to bounce back up instead of a safety net which a few may fall through the cracks. I cannot remember which official talked about the trampoline, but yeah, it makes absolute sense. 

Till next time,